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Suspended Sports at DMPS Affects Athletes' Chances of College Recruitment

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DES MOINES, Iowa — Student athletes at Des Moines Public Schools are sitting on the sidelines this year as the district holds all online classes and suspends in-person activities and sports. Some families say this could affect their student’s chances of getting recruited to play college sports.

DES MOINES, Iowa — Student athletes at Des Moines Public Schools are sitting on the sidelines this year as the district holds all online classes and suspends in-person activities and sports. Some families say this could affect their student’s chances of getting recruited to play college sports.

“This year is very big for basketball especially your junior year, so this is huge for me, this is the biggest year for me to be able to get my college scholarship,” Roosevelt High School Junior Trinity Cheatom said.

But this year is different for students in the Des Moines Public School district.

“One season can really change like whether schools will get you or not, on depending on if you have a good thing or a bad season,” Roosevelt High School Sophomore Arianna Jackson said.

Or no season at all as the district has suspended all in-person sports as they hold 100% online classes.

“These kids that are wanting to play at that high level need to continue to play and get and better, and it’s a huge disadvantage when some of our sitting home, and others are continuing to play,” Arianna’s mother Cory Jackson said.

Because other schools in central Iowa have implemented some in-person learning this year, they are also allowing in-person activities and sports.

“It hurts a little bit to not be able to go to a football game or not be able to play basketball and be participate it honestly hurts knowing that other people around us are able to do that and we aren’t,” Cheatom said.

Cheatom is already talking to several recruiters to play D1 college basketball so her dad isn’t as worried about her, he is worried about other students in the district.

“I work mostly with at-risk students at Lincoln. And so, my fear is, is that if kids don’t have activities at school, then they’re not going to participate. Virtually at all,” Trinity’s father Toussaint Cheatom said.

Now because the school districts are so close together, both families said if the decision to stay online lasts more than a year then they would greatly consider moving just ten minutes down the road so their daughters could play basketball in a different school district.